Collaborative Work

TRANSDISCIPLINARY SKILL: Collaborative work

DEFINITION: Collaborative work addresses the trans-disciplinary skills of communication, including non-verbal, social interaction, research, thinking and self-management (ATLs).

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOME:
Students are able to: effectively* engage in active dialogue to achieve a specific outcome.

*effectively refers to intercultural awareness and inclusion (NIS Mission Statement

FORM / STRUCTURE IN APPLICATION AT NIS:
When planning collaborative group work, the following elements should be taken into consideration, where applicable:

Click for full-size image

STRATEGIES/PROCESSES FOR HOW THIS MAY BE TAUGHT AT NIS:

PIES

ROLE IDENTIFICATION: Devil’s advocate, Listener, Idea generator, Helper, Clarifier, Mediator, Joker, Sniper, Decision Maker, Dominator (see G5 UoI – How We Organise Ourselves)

NO INTERRUPTIONS OR CROSS TALK
Person #2 paraphrases the comments of person #1 – allow a certain length of time
Person #2 responds to the same question or prompt – allowing the same time frame
Continue so that all members have had the opportunity to contribute

BUS STOP
Each group responds to a different related prompts on a topic
After a certain amount of time, each small group is asked to move clockwise to the next station. (Group 1 moves to Station 2, Group 2 moves to Station 3, … the last group moves to Station 1).
At their next station, the group spends a few minutes reading what the prior group wrote and then adds their own ideas or makes additions or comments on the prior ideas.
Continue until every group is back to their original station.

EXIT SLIPS (used to follow up on the interim results of collaborative work)
1. Prompts that document learning: —Example: Write one understanding you learned today. —Example: Discuss how today’s lesson could be used in the real world.
2. Prompts that emphasize the process of learning: —Example: I didn’t understand… —Example: Write one question you have about today’s lesson.
3. Prompts to evaluate the effectiveness of instruction:
—Example: Describe the pros and cons of working in small groups today.
4. Other exit prompts include: —Please explain more about… —I was most surprised today by…
– provide cards (or small notebook, if regular activity) for students to write down responses.
review the exit slips to evaluate student understanding and how you may need to alter instruction (could also be included in student portfolios)

COLLABORATIVE TECHNOLOGIES:
ex: typewithme

ASSESSMENT:
– If the outcome of the collaborative work is to be assessed, students need to understand whether the grade is common to all group members, or if the grade is individual. In most cases, it is advised that the latter take precedence.

Reference List:
Concept to Classroom: Thirteen Ed Online. http://www.thirteen.org/edonline/concept2class/coopcollab/implement_sub2.html
Davies, B. “Tools for Teaching” http://teaching.berkeley.edu/bgd/collaborative.html r
Ngow, K. “Enhanding Student Thinking Through Collaboration” Eric Digest: ERIC Clearinghouse on Reading, English, and Communication Digest #130
http://www.indiana.edu/~reading/ieo/digests/d130.html
Powell, W & Kusima-Powell, O. Making the Difference: Learning Guide – Differentiation in International Schools. EAF Press, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. 2007.
Reading Rockets: Teaching kids to read and helping those who struggle. WETA. http://www.readingrockets.org/sitecontact
R.I.T. Online Learning. http://online.rit.edu/faculty/teaching_strategies/collaborative_learning/strategies.cfm

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