Oral Presentation

TRANS DISCIPLINARY SKILL: Oral Presentations

DEFINITION :
An oral presentation is a method of communicating information verbally supported by images, visual aids and/or technology. The information can be delivered as group discussions, speeches, debates and class presentations. Presentations can be delivered individually or as part of a group.

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOME:
Students will be able to effectively communicate orally in a wide variety of situations for a specific purpose and audience.

FORM / STRUCTURE IN APPLICATION AT NIS:

Identify the purpose
– To inform
– To persuade
– To justify
– To entertain (etc)

Identify the audience
– Who is my audience? How do I know?
– How does my audience impact my approach?
– Does the audience match my purpose?
– Is the language and content appropriate for the audience and purpose?
– How do the audience and the purpose impact structure?
– How do the audience and the purpose impact the content?

Devise a title? (If appropriate ie formal presentation )
– Attention grabbing
– Relevant
– Succinct

Organisation:
– may be similar in structure to an essay, or vary depending on audience and purpose

Choice of appropriate technology from a variety of presentation modes (SEE “DIGITAL PRESENTATION OF INFORMATION” FOR SPECIFIC DETAILS):
– iMovie
– Prezi
– SAM animation
– Podcasts
– Keynote
– iBook

Techniques:
– use of note cards
– maintaining eye contact
– tone of voice
– fluency

Explicit expectations for during / after the presentation
– Discussion (including question and answer)
– Peer assessment
– Action (what is the expected outcome of the oral presentation? should the audience be moved to action? engage in a response? follow up with questions? etc.)

PROCESSES FOR HOW THIS IS TAUGHT AT NIS:

Effective speaking strategies (as appropriate):
– use of metaphors / similes / analogies
– repetition for effect
– quotes / references to justify evidence
– collective “WE” (as appropriate)
– “YOU” to lend a personal touch (as appropriate)
– pregnant pauses / wait time
– rhetorical questions
– anecdotes
– planned emphasis of the most essential ideas

NOTE: Presentations should not be limited to formal or pre-planned communication. Oral discussion should include strategies to engage all students.
– Random selection (ie popsicle sticks with names)
– Impromptu responses
– Roles within a group; rotation of those roles
– Round Robin

Resources:

Presentation Skills
http://people.engr.ncsu.edu/txie/publications/oral_presentation_skills.pdf

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